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Susanne Lohmann

 
Susanne Lohmann
 

Lohmann SusanneSusanne Lohmann

Professor of Political Science and Public Policy

Director of the Jacob Marschak Interdisciplinary Colloquium on Mathematics in the Behavioral Sciences

Carnegie Mellon University, 1991


Homepage

Office: 4343 Bunche Hall
Phone: (310) 794-5860
Fax: (310) 825-0778
E-mail:lohmann@ucla.edu

Mailing Address:
UCLA Department of Political Science
4289 Bunche Hall
Box 951472
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1472



Curriculum Vitae
Short Bio

Public Policy
Human Complex Systems
Center for Governance
Marschak Colloquium
AAUP Local Chapter at UCLA

Class Websites


Course Descriptions:
Ethics and Governance
Can't We Make Moral Judgments?
Diversity, Disagreement, and Democracy
Understanding the Public Issue Life Cycle
Global Environment and World Politics
Universities, the Rise of the West, and the Rise of the Rest


Fields:

Methodology, Political Theory, Comparative Politics

Research Interests in the Past: 
Game Theory; Collective Action; Monetary Policy and Central Banking

Current Research Interests:
Human Complex Systems; Ethics and Governance; Political Economy of Universities, Science, and Higher Education

Notes:
Susanne Lohmann is Professor of Political Science and Public Policy and Director of the Jacob Marschak Interdisciplinary Colloquium on Mathematics in the Behavioral Sciences at UCLA.

Professor Lohmann received her Ph.D. in economics and political economy from Carnegie Mellon University in 1991. She taught at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business before joining UCLA in 1993. Professor Lohmann was John M. Olin Fellow at Carnegie Mellon University; Alfred P. Sloan Fellow, also at Carnegie Mellon University; James and Doris McNamara Fellow at Stanford University; John M. Olin Fellow at the University of Southern California; Fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences; and Fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

Professor Lohmann’s articles on collective action and central banking have appeared in American Economic Review, American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, World Politics, International Organization, and other leading social science journals. Her current research focus is the political economy of research universities and higher education. She is completing a book titled How Universities Think: The Hidden Work of a Complex Institution, which is under contract with Cambridge University Press.

Professor Lohmann teaches courses on ethics and governance. Her online course on "Diversity, Disagreement, and Democracy" embeds mini games of cooperation, competition, coordination, and collaboration in a massively multiplayer game of life. She is the recipient of two teaching awards.


Selected Publications on Collective Action:

"A Signaling Model of Informative and Manipulative Political Action," American Political Science Review, Vol. 88, 1993: 319-333.

"Information Aggregation Through Costly Political Action," American Economic Review, Vol. 84, 1994: 518-530.

"Dynamics of Informational Cascades: The Monday Demonstrations in Leipzig, East Germany, 1989-1991," World Politics, Vol. 47, 1994: 42-101.

"An Information Rationale for the Power of Special Interests," American Political Science Review, Vol. 92, 1998: 809-827.

 

Selected Publications on Monetary Policy and Central Banking: 

"Optimal Commitment in Monetary Policy:  Credibility versus Flexibility," American Economic Review, Vol. 82, 1992: 273-286.

 "Federalism and Central Bank Independence: The Politics of German Monetary Policy, 1957-1992," World Politics, Vol. 50, 1998: 401-446.  

"What Price Accountability? The Lucas Island Model and the Politics of Monetary Policy," American Journal of Political Science, Vol. 43, No. 2, 1999: 396-430. 

"Sollbruchstelle: Deep Uncertainty and the Design of Monetary Institutions," International Finance, Vol. 3, 2000: 391-411.

 

Selected Publications on the Political Economy of Universities, Science, and Higher Education: 

 "Darwinian Medicine for the University," in Governing Academia, ed. Ronald G. Ehrenberg, Cornell University Press, 2003, pp. 71-90.

How Universities Think: The Hidden Work of a Complex Institution.

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